March252014
fdrlibrary:

todaysdocument:


Photograph of Fire Fighters at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, 03/25/1911

One of the deadliest industrial disasters in United States history, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City left 146 workers dead in 18 minutes on March 25, 1911.  
Locked doors kept the workers from escaping; there was not enough water to put out the flames, and firemen’s ladders were too short to reach the upper stories. Many of the young women and men working there leapt out the windows and fell to their deaths onto the sidewalk outside. Others were crushed in the elevator shaft or when the fire escape collapsed.
The fire led to sweeping reforms in labor laws and safety standards, providing a boost to labor unions, and was a pivotal event in the career of future labor secretary Frances Perkins.
via Prologue: A Factory Fire and Frances Perkins
Our post from 2012 has additional photos of the fire and the victims, a few may be considered graphic.  
(We’re assuming the photo above shows fdny in action at the fire.)

You can find out more on Frances Perkins on our website as well: http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/aboutfdr/perkins.html

fdrlibrary:

todaysdocument:

Photograph of Fire Fighters at the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory, 03/25/1911

One of the deadliest industrial disasters in United States history, the Triangle Shirtwaist Factory fire in New York City left 146 workers dead in 18 minutes on March 25, 1911.  

Locked doors kept the workers from escaping; there was not enough water to put out the flames, and firemen’s ladders were too short to reach the upper stories. Many of the young women and men working there leapt out the windows and fell to their deaths onto the sidewalk outside. Others were crushed in the elevator shaft or when the fire escape collapsed.

The fire led to sweeping reforms in labor laws and safety standards, providing a boost to labor unions, and was a pivotal event in the career of future labor secretary Frances Perkins.

via Prologue: A Factory Fire and Frances Perkins

Our post from 2012 has additional photos of the fire and the victims, a few may be considered graphic.  

(We’re assuming the photo above shows fdny in action at the fire.)

You can find out more on Frances Perkins on our website as well: http://www.fdrlibrary.marist.edu/aboutfdr/perkins.html

(Source: research.archives.gov, via picardwouldtotallyrulekirk)

11PM

picardwouldtotallyrulekirk:

When Kara and I buy a house I will most definitely have a bee garden, a consumable garden, and plentiful bird/owl/bat houses!

(Source: gerhard-martin)

11PM
redjeep:

thequietgregorianchanter:

spookyjoys:

I have only heard the story behind this picture once, but it literally brought tears to my eyes. On September 11, 2001, a hijacked plane knifed into the side of the Pentagon. We all know that. What very few people have heard is shortly afterwards, the director of a nursery in the building stood looking at the children in her charge, wondering how to move all of the babies and toddlers to safety.
A marine rushed into the room and asked if she was alright. She needed help and she told him that. He turned and ran out; the woman assumed that he had gone away for good. As she formulated a plan of action, she heard footsteps in the hall.
The man had returned—this time, though, he was not alone. At least forty other Marines followed him. They picked up the babies in their cribs, the toddlers, the helpless infants. They carried them through the halls and to a nearby park, where they arranged the cribs in a circle and set the toddlers in the middle. Then they stood guard outside, never allowing the children to be unattended.
When I first saw this picture, I thought that the man carrying the children was their father. Now I realize that he was not related to them by blood, but by nationality. He is an American. They are American children. He is not their father, he is their protector. He’s a United States Marine.

God Bless our military.

This story is total bullshit. There is no Nursery in the Pentagon! That is not a Marine holding children and there sure as fuck wasn’t a circle of 40 fuckin Marines guarding them. Don’t believe me check snope.com 

redjeep:

thequietgregorianchanter:

spookyjoys:

I have only heard the story behind this picture once, but it literally brought tears to my eyes. On September 11, 2001, a hijacked plane knifed into the side of the Pentagon. We all know that. What very few people have heard is shortly afterwards, the director of a nursery in the building stood looking at the children in her charge, wondering how to move all of the babies and toddlers to safety.

A marine rushed into the room and asked if she was alright. She needed help and she told him that. He turned and ran out; the woman assumed that he had gone away for good. As she formulated a plan of action, she heard footsteps in the hall.

The man had returned—this time, though, he was not alone. At least forty other Marines followed him. They picked up the babies in their cribs, the toddlers, the helpless infants. They carried them through the halls and to a nearby park, where they arranged the cribs in a circle and set the toddlers in the middle. Then they stood guard outside, never allowing the children to be unattended.

When I first saw this picture, I thought that the man carrying the children was their father. Now I realize that he was not related to them by blood, but by nationality. He is an American. They are American children. He is not their father, he is their protector. He’s a United States Marine.

God Bless our military.

This story is total bullshit. There is no Nursery in the Pentagon! That is not a Marine holding children and there sure as fuck wasn’t a circle of 40 fuckin Marines guarding them. Don’t believe me check snope.com 

(Source: talkrevolutiontome)

11PM

popmech:

I’m a cycling enthusiast, and when theweather is bad I use a bicycle trainer in my apartment. But riding to nowhere has always felt pointless. This got me thinking about how I could use my pedaling to produce electricity. By driving a generator with the movement of the back wheel, I figured I could run a lamp or charge my phone. Realistically, this wouldn’t do much to cut my utility bills (or carbon emissions), but it would give my indoor riding a sense of purpose. Besides, I was curious to see what the project involved. 

To skip ahead a bit, I ended up rigging my bike to a 24-volt, 200-watt electric motor, which I modified slightly to generate electricity instead of doing mechanical work. I used the motor (now, operationally, a generator) to charge a 12-volt lead–acid battery. And, finally, I added an inverter to convert the battery’s DC current into an AC current, which is what’s needed to power anything you’d normally plug into a wall outlet, and to store power so you can use appliances even when not pedaling. 

Pedal Power! How to Build a Bike Generator

(via picardwouldtotallyrulekirk)

11PM
historicaltimes:

A tattooist’s wife, 1907.

historicaltimes:

A tattooist’s wife, 1907.

(via americabymotorcycle)

10AM
thelovelyartistic:

dolphinboy89:

i dont even know where to start
 

So much ‘Merica  I don’t know what to do…

thelovelyartistic:

dolphinboy89:

i dont even know where to start

So much ‘Merica I don’t know what to do…

(Source: 12-gauge-rage, via msbolshevik)

12AM
anyskin:

Dirigibles over New York.

anyskin:

Dirigibles over New York.

(via americabymotorcycle)

12AM

sillogismo:

fancyadance:

Siena Cathedral, Italy

x x x x x

(via picardwouldtotallyrulekirk)

12AM
policymic:

Going to college on minimum wage is near impossible today

This chart from Michigan State University computer science graduate student Randy Olson explains why working your way through college — something many people who grew up in more fortunate economic times recommend — is pretty much impossible these days.
Comparing federal minimum wage trends to the rise in MSU tuition over the past 30 years, Olson found that the average 2013 MSU student would have to work six times as long at minimum wage to pay for their tuition as they would in 1979. As Olson writes:
The 1979 student would have to work about 10 weeks at a part-time job (~203 hours) — basically, they could pay for tuition just by working part-time over the Summer. In contrast, the 2013 student would have to work for 35 ½ weeks (~1420 hours) — over half the year — at a full-time job to pay for the same number of credit hours.
Read more | Follow policymic

policymic:

Going to college on minimum wage is near impossible today

This chart from Michigan State University computer science graduate student Randy Olson explains why working your way through college — something many people who grew up in more fortunate economic times recommend — is pretty much impossible these days.

Comparing federal minimum wage trends to the rise in MSU tuition over the past 30 years, Olson found that the average 2013 MSU student would have to work six times as long at minimum wage to pay for their tuition as they would in 1979. As Olson writes:

The 1979 student would have to work about 10 weeks at a part-time job (~203 hours) — basically, they could pay for tuition just by working part-time over the Summer. In contrast, the 2013 student would have to work for 35 ½ weeks (~1420 hours) — over half the year — at a full-time job to pay for the same number of credit hours.

Read moreFollow policymic

(via picardwouldtotallyrulekirk)

March232014